Bureaucratic Reputation

Maor, Moshe and Michael, Howlett. Forthcoming. “Policy instrument interactions in policy mixes: Surveying the conceptual and methodological landscape.” In Routledge Handbook of Policy Tools, edited by Michael, Howlett. London: Routledge. Publisher's Version Abstract

 

Resolving a complex policy problem often requires a mix of policy instruments and thus the identification of the most promising instrument combination. However, the relevant terminology of instrument interactions in a policy mix has not been standardized, hindering a straightforward identification of superior instrument combinations. To address this challenge, the chapter defines the terminology necessary for detecting three different possible policy instrument interactions—namely synergistic, counter-productive, and additive effects. It identifies two approaches to analyzing instrument mix effects: the “effect-based” and the “effort-based” methods. It then discusses the practical advantages and limitations of each approach and elaborates on key methodological issues that policy scholars and practitioners face at each step of developing a new policy mix. 

 

Resolving a complex policy problem often requires a mix of policy instruments and thus the identification of the most promising instrument combination. However, the relevant terminology of instrument interactions in a policy mix has not been standardized, hindering a straightforward identification of superior instrument combinations. To address this challenge, the chapter defines the terminology necessary for detecting three different possible policy instrument interactions—namely synergistic, counter-productive, and additive effects. It identifies two approaches to analyzing instrument mix effects: the “effect-based” and the “effort-based” methods. It then discusses the practical advantages and limitations of each approach and elaborates on key methodological issues that policy scholars and practitioners face at each step of developing a new policy mix. 

 

Maor, Moshe. Forthcoming. “Taking stokes: Strategic communication by regulatory agencies as a form of reputation management.” In Handbook on Regulatory Authorities, edited by Martino, Maggetti, Fabrizio, Di Mascio, and Alessandro, Natalini. Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar Publishing. Abstract

The chapter takes stock of studies that focus on regulatory agencies’ deliberate use of strategic communications as a form of reputation management, discussing the critiques that have recently surfaced and responding to them. To shed light on these issues, the chapter defines core concepts and reviews the major findings in this field, paying particular attention to regulatory agencies’ decisions concerning whether and how to communicate. It thereafter describes unanswered questions that can inspire and guide future research. Future agendas include, for example, the selection of audience segmentation strategies, and the management of competing and even contradictory communication for segmented audiences when agencies enjoy exclusive jurisdiction, in contrast to instances in which agencies share regulatory authority.

Maor, Moshe. 2016. “Strategic silence.” In The SAGE Encyclopedia of Corporate Reputation, edited by Craig E. Carroll, Pp. 823–824. Thousand Oaks,, CA: SAGE Publications, Inc. Publisher's Version